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Coyote Gulch is a popular backpacking destination near Escalante, Utah. The canyon is roughly 13.2 miles long and is beautifully photogenic. The main attractions of this hike are the beautiful red sandstone walls that line the banks of the natural spring fed stream as well as the natural stone arches. Coyote Gulch is accessible from the Hole-In-The-Rock Road, just outside of Escalante, UT. The canyon has the scenic Jacob Hamblin Arch, the Coyote Gulch Natural Bridge, and Jughandle Arch. More information is included in the photo captions below. The following link provides good information on finding trailheads: Coyote Gulch Trailheads. Point to any image for an enlargement (using the arrow keys to center) or use the slideshow at the bottom of the page. See all TheWorldinLight has to offer at Destinations and Topics.


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photo of a tall red sandstone wall lined with trees in Coyote Gulch in Utah
Coyote Gulch #5040
From the Red Well Trailhead, the route into Coyote Gulch is easy. Natural Springs provide the first water feeding the stream through the gulch after about one mile. As you can see from this photo, the canyon is lined with tall red sandstone walls.

photo of a single tree in front of a tall, sheer red sandstone wall in Coyote Gulch
Coyote Gulch #5054
The red sandstone walls in Coyote Gulch are sometimes very tall and sheer. Due to year-round water, the canyon is full of vegetation.

photo of a bend in Coyote Gulch in Utah
Coyote Gulch #5067
Coyote Gulch winds back and forth for miles - sometimes with red sandstone walls on one side, sometimes on both sides. Consequently, the stream must be crossed many times and sometimes waded for short distances until the stream-side trail resumes.

photo of a tree-lined wall in Coyote Gulch
Coyote Gulch #5068
Although the stream through Coyote Gulch is fed by natural springs, it must be treated prior to drinking or being used with food. Both Coyote Gulch and other canyons that connect to it have water that is used by cattle as well as by other hikers. From the Red Well Trailhead, it isn't until about two miles into the gulch before fences prevent cattle from entering further into the gulch.

photo of a deep alcove in a red sandstone canyon wall of Coyote Gulch in Utah
Coyote Gulch #5069
In many places, the stream has undercut the red sandstone walls of the canyon. In some places the canyon walls are undercut by as much as 60 feet creating huge alcoves where one can walk for perhaps a couple of hundred feet under enormous ceilings of red sandstone.

photo of the canyon walls in Coyote Gulch of Utah
Coyote Gulch #5071
In many places the canyon opens into large flood-plains. These often occur at the confluence of Coyote Gulch with other feeder canyons.

photo of Jacob Hamblin Arch in Coyote Gulch in Utah
Jacob Hamblin Arch #5074
One of the major attractions of a hike through Coyote Gulch is the scenic Jacob Hamblin Arch, which is located roughly six and a half miles from the Red Well Trailhead.

photo of rock walls near Jacob Hamblin Arch in Coyote Gulch
Coyote Gulch #5077
This photo shows some of the canyon walls near the Jacob Hamblin Arch in Coyote Gulch.

photo looking through Jacob Hamblin Arch in Utah
Jacob Hamblin Arch #5080
It's possible to take photos of the Jacob Hamblin Arch from both sides. The stream winds right around the bend where the arch is perched.

photo of the scenic Jacob Hamblin Arch in Coyote Gulch
Jacob Hamblin Arch #5086
There is a natural spring located about chest-high on the face of the wall on the downstream side of Jacob Hamblin Arch. This is a very convenient source of safe drinking water.

photo of a stream meandering through the red rock walls of 
Coyote Gulch in Utah
Coyote Gulch #5090
I hiked Coyote Gulch in early April. At that time, the stream was typically only a few inches deep and could be waded in a pair of well-made waterproof hiking boots. However, in many places the streambed narrows and consequently, becomes deeper. The narrower spots could be crossed with a good jump or a well-positioned stone. A note: there are a few spots that have quicksand. These are generally not deep - perhaps only a foot or so. The real danger here is not sinking until your cap floats, but the expectation that you're stepping onto solid sand and instead suddenly sinking a foot or so, with the possibility of a leg injury.

Another photo of Jacob Hamblin Arch.
Coyote Gulch #5091
This is another photo of the Jacob Hamblin Arch in Coyote Gulch.

photo of a rock formation in the Coyote Gulch of Utah
Coyote Gulch #5108
In addition to the arches and natural bridge in Coyote Gulch, erosion has also created a few interesting rock formations.

photo of the Coyote Natural Bridge
Coyote Natural Bridge #5114
This is a photo of the Coyote Gulch Natural Bridge, located about a half mile downstream of Jacob Hamblin Arch in Coyote Gulch.

photo of the stream flowing under the Coyote Gulch Natural Bridge in Utah
Coyote Natural Bridge #5115
The stream and hiking trails in Coyote Gulch pass right through - or below - the Coyote Gulch Natural Bridge.

photo of the Natural Bridge in Coyote Gulch.
Natural Bridge #5118
Although spring is a popular time to hike Coyote Gulch, its length and breadth are such that people can be widely distributed. There are campsites located throughout the canyon and it should be possible to camp in privacy.

photo of Coyote Gulch Natural Bridge from the downstream side
Coyote Natural Bridge #5130
Since the trail goes right through the Natural Bridge, it's possible to take photos of both sides of Coyote Gulch Natural Bridge.

photo of the scenic red sandstone walls of Coyote Gulch in Utah
Coyote Gulch #5135
Coyote Gulch is very scenic place, making it an interesting and enjoyable place to hike.

photo of an alcove created by the undercuttine erosion of the stream through Coyote Gulch 



in Utah
Coyote Gulch #5152
There are many trailheads that feed into Coyote Gulch, providing many options of how to do the hike - it can be in and back the same way, or in and a different way out.

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