What's New

Praying Mantis Photos

Site-Map


Fauna:

Andean Condors

Big Horned Sheep

Birds (Page 1)

Birds (Page 2)

Black Swallowtail Butterflies

Butterflies

Frogs

Hummingbirds (Page 1)

Hummingbirds (Page 2)

Insects (Page 1)

Insects (Page 2)

Insects (Page 3)

Lizards

Mammals

Painted Lady Butterflies

Reptiles

Spiders

Tiger Swallowtail Butterflies

Wildlife (Page 1)

Wildlife (Page 2)

This page has close-up pictures of Praying Mantises and their faces, showing detail not seen with the bare eye. Praying Mantises are pretty interesting creatures. Praying Mantises are pretty interesting creatures. No other insect can turn its head like a Mantis can - with about the same amount of movement as a human. No other insect I know will lock eyes with you, displaying what seems to be an intelligent curiousity. And they are capable of learning to recognize you. Catch one, keep it as a pet, and it will learn to not fear you and to walk into your hand without hesitation. Perhaps it is for these reasons and more that Praying Mantises have become popular to keep as pets.

There are approximately 2000 species of Praying Mantids in existence around the world. They are some of the most ferocious predators in the insect world. Some species of Mantid (also sometimes called Mantis) grow to about six inches in length. As odd and unbelievable as it might seem, the largest of these have been known to sometimes catch, kill and eat small rodents, birds, and snakes. I hope you enjoy these Praying Mantis photos. See all TheWorldinLight has to offer at Destinations and Topics.


Slideshow



Point to any image for an enlargement

Guestbook

Use the arrow keys to center enlargements

a close-up photo of a face of a Praying Mantis
Mantis #5968
The face of a Praying Mantis.

a close-up picture of a Praying Mantis face
Praying Mantis #5965
A Praying Mantis will groom itself much like a cat - by licking itself or licking a leg then rubbing it across its face.

a close-up picture of a Praying Mantis cleaning its front leg
Mantis Grooming #5959
A Mantis cleaning its front leg.

a macro photo of a Praying Mantis with legs in the praying position
Praying Mantis #4593
A Mantis in praying position.

a close-up picture of a Mantis praying
Praying Mantis #5975
A Mantis posing for a photo. Praying Mantises seem to be mesmerized by looking into human eyes. They will look for extended times into a SLR camera lens, seeing there the eye of the photographer.

photo of a Praying Mantis' Face
Praying Mantis #5986
Another in the Praying Mantis series of photos.

Praying Mantises are also often kept as pets in small terrariums. Some pet stores sell the "ootheca" - that is, the egg cases from which mantids hatch. These egg cases can hatch anywhere from about a dozen to several hundred mantids.

Picture of a Praying Mantis grooming
Praying Mantis Grooming #5970
A Chinese Mantis cleaning its front leg.

a close-up picture of a Praying Mantis showing its tongue
Praying Mantis Facial Profile #5987
The profile of a face of a mantis.

a picture showing the eye colors of a Praying Mantis
Praying Mantis Mouth #5988
A picture showing the details of the mouth of a mantis.

photo showing a Praying Mantis cleaning the spikes on its leg
Praying Mantis #5974
Picture of a praying mantis using its tongue to clean the spines on its leg.

photo showing the long front legs of a Praying Mantis
Praying Mantis #5980
The long front legs of a mantis.

a Praying Mantis posing for a photo
Praying Mantis #5978
Mantises make excellent pets. This one is posing for a photo.

As pets, Praying Mantises are quite interesting. They become accustomed to being with and being handled by humans and seem quite content to perch in one's palm or on one's shoulder. Some of their behaviors are akin to more conventional pets. For instance, they clean their legs and feet much like a cat does. They'll lick their legs and then sometimes rub them against their head.

photo showing the dark eyes typical of a Praying Mantis at night
Praying Mantis #5969
In the dark, mantis' eyes become entirely black. This one is just beginning to recover its daylight eye color.

a photo of a brown male mantis mating with a green female
Mantises Mating #2078
The male mantis is typically much smaller than the female, as this photo of a brown male mantis mating with a green female mantis shows.

picture of the beady eyes of a Praying Mantis staring into the camera
Praying Mantis #2
Wild mantises often show no fear of humans. This one seemed captivated by the camera.

photo of a Praying Mantis eating a Katydid
Mantis Eating a Katydid #1947
A mantis can catch and eat prey that is considerably larger than themselves. This one has caught and is eating a Katydid.

a close-up picture of a brown Mantis
Brown Mantis #1865
Picture of a young, brown Praying Mantis. It is believed that a Praying Mantis assumes either a brown or green color at each molting phase, according to how wet the habitat has been - green during wet periods, and brown during dry.

picture of a green Praying Mantis
Praying Mantis Mouth #6007
Picture showing the mouth parts of a Praying Mantis.

Praying Mantises are welcome insects in most flower gardens because they are effective predators - feeding on other insects that are garden pests. Once born, the mantids are small versions of adults and begin hunting and preying on other insects immediately. As they grow, they undergo an "incomplete metamorphosis". That is, they do not go through a pupae or larval stage. However, they do periodically shed their shell-like skin, allowing them to grow larger.

a chinese mantis eating a Katydid
Mantis Eating Katydid #1954 Praying Mantises will only catch and eat prey that is alive.

a macro photo of a Praying Mantis' face
Praying Mantis Face #5973 This is a photo of the face of a Praying Mantis.

picture of an immature brown Praying Mantis
Brown Mantis #1861

a close-up photo of a Praying Mantis head
Praying Mantis #6011 This is a macro photo of a Praying Mantis Head.

a macro photo of a Praying Mantis
Praying Mantis Macro #6012 This is another macro photo of a Praying Mantises face.

a photo showing the hatching of Praying Mantises
Mantis Hatch #7527 A Praying Mantis "oothecae" - an egg sac - can hatch anywhere from a dozen to several hundred baby mantises.

a picture showing the Mandibles of a Praying Mantis
Praying Mantis Mandibles #6119 The mouth of a Praying Mantis has strong mandibles for biting through the tough exoskeletons of insects they eat.

The Praying Mantis Series of Picures
Praying Mantis #6120

a close-up photo of a Mantis
Praying Mantis Close-up #6121 This is a close-up photo of a Praying Mantis.

Mantis with the sky in the background
Praying Mantis #2375
This Praying Mantis was in my garden.

photo of a Praying Mantis standing up with front legs extended
Praying Mantis #2643
This photo shows the long front legs of the Praying Mantis.

Top

Painted Lady Butterfly Photos

Macro Spider Photos



Home page of TheWorldinLight

The Photography of:
Robert D. Stephens
TheWorldinLight Photographic Gallery
TheWorldinLight-at-aol-dot-com








Previous Slide



Next Slide

Previous Slide

Next Slide

Free DHTML scripts provided by
Dynamic Drive

Top


Flowers Landscapes People Temples Abstracts Flight Wildlife

About my gallery

FAQ

Guestbook What's New Site Map

All photographs are the property of Robert Stephens and TheWorldinLight Photographic Gallery. Unauthorized use or reproduction is prohibited by US copyright law.